How American People Spend Their Time

carry-on-america-time

Everybody knows that Americans are always busy — yet busy with doing what?

This infographic is exploring amounts of time they spend on eating, sleeping, drinking, working, doing household chores, buying goods or services, watching TV, and all that sort of things. If you want to learn everything about how the average American spends his or her time during the day, just keep on reading.

The infographic is actually based on The American Time Use Survey (ATUS), http://www.bls.gov/. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) measures how much time people are spending on activities such as watching TV, (paid) work, volunteering. childcare, or socializing.

Regarding their work, Americans are working the most hours on Tuesdays. This may also be the reason why Americans experience the most difficulty to fall asleep on Tuesdays.

On average, Americans are working some 4.5 (four and a half) hours per day Mondays through Fridays. On Saturdays, they will be working  about one third of that time, and on Sundays, even less. This mix is including all adults of 15 years of age and above, so whereas it may at first come across as inaccurate or at least a bit confusing, you will realize it is not for that reason. The mix includes retired people, unemployed individuals, students, as well as every working person throughout the nation. (more…)


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My Dear Friend I think you’re an idiot

I’ve just this minute found out that you’ve gotten your girlfriend pregnant.

I should be very happy for you, when in fact I’d quite like to knock your head off of something very hard, tie your hands behind your back and demand to borrow the TARDIS from The Doctor in order to go back a few months so that you never meet her.

We (me, the boyfriend and friends) have told you since day one that she was out to get everything she could from you. First it was staying in your house 24/7, even when you were at work or with us. Next it was unofficially moving in with you, then getting a key to your house when you wouldn’t even give your friends of at least 10 years one for case of emergency. Then she got kicked out of college for never showing up because hanging on to your every word was more important than her education.

Next came the jokes of how she’d deliberately fall pregnant in order to ‘keep’ you and get money from the government. Yes, even you made these jokes. (more…)


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My First Rosh Hashanah

While we talk basically every day, Peter and I don’t see each other very often. He lives in Cambridge, Mass.; I live in Brooklyn, N.Y. (Once the book arrives in November, though, we’ll be traveling together a lot for promotional readings and talks. We’ll keep you posted on those events.)

He and his wife, Amy, invited me for Rosh Hashanah, and so, I made the trip. Amtrak was terrible, and I arrived to the new year’s dinner a little later than I’d hoped — right into the middle of a party. They’d invited several other friends, most of whom have kids, so I was tackled at the door (this was Peter’s son, Sam), and welcomed with my first ever bite of filter fish.

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Belief Unbracketed

Scott starts teaching this week, a course similar to one that I taught for many years at Simmons College; a freshman expository writing course that uses texts relating to religion and cultural studies. One of the challenges that I faced in the classroom was how to not only be objective and allow all the students their own beliefs , but also how to not let my own beliefs bleed through in my teaching. And yet, I still struggle with whether or not this is an appropriate response in a religion class.

When I was a student at Harvard Divinity School, there was very little discussion in the classroom about individual belief, which is as it should be in a scholarly discussion of religion. And yet, at the same time, there was always a sense of something lacking. There was a point at which engagement with texts and ideas had to hit a wall, as we were all afraid to let our own religious views actually come to the surface. (more…)


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A Sleeping Thief

Stealing stuff is stupid, but stealing pillows and leaving a trail of it to where you are sleeping on the stolen pillows is really stupid.

In this photo released by the Monroe Police Department, burglary suspect Kyle Burress is seen sleeping on pillows and pads allegedly stolen from storage containers at a nearby department store July 9, 2008, in Monroe, Wash. Burress was one of two men who were found asleep on apparent stolen goods after they allegedly broke into storage containers at Fred Meyer and left a trail of evidence to where they were found asleep. Police took some photographs before waking and arresting the pair, who have been charged with second-degree theft. (AP Photo/Monroe Police Department)

In this photo released by the Monroe Police Department, burglary suspect Kyle Burress is seen sleeping on pillows and pads allegedly stolen from storage containers at a nearby department store July 9, 2008, in Monroe, Wash. Burress was one of two men who were found asleep on apparent stolen goods after they allegedly broke into storage containers at Fred Meyer and left a trail of evidence to where they were found asleep. Police took some photographs before waking and arresting the pair, who have been charged with second-degree theft. (AP Photo/Monroe Police Department)

Apparently this guy and his friend broke into a department store, loaded up on things like pillows and hammocks, and then decided to just lay down and take a nap when (no surprise!) the police caught them.

You can read the full news story here. Looks pretty comfy, don’t you think?

 

Why Decimal Points Matter

We drove past this gas station with some awfully expensive Powerade Drinks the other day.

$250 is a big difference from $2.50. You’d think they would have noticed this and maybe changed what the sign said. But I guess it’s “close enough” for them.

powerade

WordPress Woes and a Name Tag

Well, I’ve finally finished upgrading to WordPress 2.6. It was kind of tricky, as it seems all of my plug-ins didn’t like the change and kept giving me errors saying “cannot redeclare snoopy”…I never heard of an error like that before!

Nonetheless, I have everything working now and I’m happy to say we’ve also got the SezWho plug, which is a new thing for entrecard users, giving you credits for comments You can learn more about that over at Entrecard.

Also today I’ve got a picture submitted to us by Dimaks of Ctrl + Alt + Delete:

 

It is a name tag from a waitress they had at a Japanese pizza shop. You can read the full story about it here.

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Mastering the art of self-humiliation

This is a post from my sister: Anne.
infinitySo I have this pair of pants. (Okay, they’re capris, but who cares.) Wearing these capris is pretty damn close to wearing a cloud. They’re comfortable in all the right places and smooth as a baby’s bum from being washed so many times. They’re beige and are just starting to show their age; there’s a bleach spot on the cuff of the left leg and one of the pockets is ripped at the corner, but they’re great to bum around in.

They’re maternity.

I found them when I was pregnant with Julia, tucked away on a crowded clearance rack at a maternity clothing store. They didn’t look like maternity pants and I was pleasantly surprised when I tried them on and found they made me look good, which was a hard look to achieve because I looked like a manatee while pregnant with her. I broke them in so well that when I packed up my maternity stuff I left them out so I could wear them around the house. Seems I never put them away after I had Oliver, either. (more…)


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What not to say to complete strangers

graphLast night, out of the blue, I remembered something that I haven’t thought of in years. Let me take you back to my college days…

My roommate and I were sitting in the living room of our apartment passing the bong back and forth, trying to solve the Wheel of Fortune puzzle, when the phone rang.

A familiar-sounding male voice asked to speak to me. I placed him right away – it was Justin, a friend of mine. (Here’s where I pause for the cause and offer up a bit of background info: Justin was a great guy with a big heart. He was laid back, funny and super easy-going, and we clicked from the get-go. I always felt completely at ease when I was around him – able to be my normal, vulgar self.) Before I could answer him, he introduced himself as Brian, said he was calling from a major credit card company and explained that he had a fabulous offer lined up for me. I chuckled softly to myself – Justin was just the kind of guy who would call pretending to be a sales rep. (more…)


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